Should we be doing planning poker?

I got a message from an old colleague today with a link to a wiki page on Poker Planning and a question: “Why didn’t we do this?”

My initial reaction was that we did, we did it for years but after consideration I realised he was right – by the time he’d started working with us we had stopped using poker planning to estimate – or at least we only used it when we really needed it. So why stop? Did we lose our discipline?

The Scrum approach

Poker planning is a great way of using the wisdom of crowds to estimate stories. Points rather than days are normally used to keep the estimation abstract and these points are then tracked to calculate a team’s velocity to allow for capacity planning. In our early days of agile experimentation we followed the Scrum dogma quite rigidly – the team would gather together and examine features and help break them down to stories and then use planning poker to come up with an estimate, then the Product Owner would come along and select the stories he wanted the team to work on. More than once he commented on how he felt he was given the ‘illusion of choice’ whereby due to story size, team capacity and soft dependencies his options to select and order the backlog were severely limited.

This approach lead to us having a ‘well-groomed’ backlog but many of the groomed and estimated stories would languish in the backlog for a long period of time as small tokens of time wasted; growing stale and decreasing the signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, production bugs sat in their own backlog, prioritised separately and largely ignored by a product owner focused on building ‘the new’ and a team attempting to maintain its velocity.

A Product Owner’s role is to generate the maximum ROI through picking the stories which return the most business value for the amount of effort expended, however, the reality is often far more subtle than this; while each feature or story is technically an independent release of business value, more often than not each feature and story is part of a much bigger picture and really needs to be played in a specific order that the team understands. Backlog grooming, planning poker and sprint-stacking can become a transactional (rather than collaborative) affair leading to a poorly maintained and planned product.

Continuous deployment and a high-performing team

By the time the aforementioned colleague had joined the team we had restructured our approach. The Product Owner was embedded in the team, story and feature selection had become collaborative; there was no formal backlog grooming and commitments were agreed by small teams based upon the entire team having an in-depth understanding of both the business benefits of each feature and the estimated effort.
The roadmap was understood by the whole team and any up and coming work had either been spiked already or been analysed by the engineers and collaborated on (with UX and BA’s as necessary).

Furthermore, specialisation was respected and ownership of components encouraged: while we all love full-stack engineers, in a small team the reality is you may only have one real JS expert, one back-end expert and one HTML/CSS expert. Working on a maximum of one week iterations and with your definition of done as “released to production”, the abstraction of poker-planning-driven velocity becomes irrelevant – it’s easier for the team to work out what they can achieve in that sprint that week, estimating by days if necessary. With the onus on quality and user experience, fixing production bugs is treated as a priority and will often need to be prioritised at short notice which will impact deliverables so focusing on hard, velocity-based commitments can encourage a compromise on product quality.

So why did we stop Poker Planning?

When a product is well-established and development is lean and iterative, the team should be in control of its own destiny, understanding the vision and goals of the business and driving towards those goals with a roadmap for guidance if necessary. With the product owner embedded as part of the team and in constant collaboration with his team members the need for poker and velocity based capacity planning becomes irrelevant and the one important question becomes: “What can you (or even better, ‘we’) commit to delivering to production this week”.

With good stakeholders (or good stakeholder management) the sponsors will ask “what goals or improvements have we achieved” rather than “how many features did we complete”. With code being released to production on a weekly (or daily) basis the transparency that this approach delivers encourages trust between stakeholders, product owners and the delivery team, and negates the need for the transactional approach of poker planning, sprint stacking and velocity tracking.

Advertisements

SOA: An enabler for Continuous Delivery and innovation

Building on my experience at Westfield Labs, this presentation was delivered to Sydney CTO Summit and explores how implementing a Service Oriented Architecture allowed Westfield Labs to embrace a Lean, Agile approach to Product delivery.

The presentation covers how an SOA assisted with:

  • Management of backlog, particularly bugs
  • Managing build times
  • Cross-functional teams
  • Faster iterations
  • The ‘QA Paradox’ of better quality through reducing testers

User stories and asking “Five Whys”

We are currently coaching a new team into the ways of Agile and one of the problems we’ve encountered is getting the devs to write cards or stories using the standard Agile story formats. To Agile newbies the syntactic sugar that surrounds a story’s details often seems like a waste of time. i.e. A developer knows exactly what he means when he writes:

“Add currency code to Data Warehouse views”

and feels like he is being made to jump through hoops to turn that into:

“In order to differentiate between international sales, we need to update the data warehouse transactional views to show the currency code, so that they can report on this data.”

The reason we favour this (or the “As a [user]…” format) on agile projects is that the story describes what needs to be done and why. This means that any member of the team can understand exactly why a story has been added to the backlog and doesn’t need to get an explanation from the person that wrote the story or drill down into the acceptance criteria to discover this.

The other benefit of this format is that it forces the person writing the story to find out exactly why the requester wants that story. Indeed, in drilling down to the real requirement, the analyst may discover that the real business requirement is not what the requester is asking for at all.

Aslak Hellesoy (the creator of Cucumber) illustrates all this perfectly in the cucumber documentation where he describes the process of asking the Five Why’s to discover the underlying requirements – the why in the story.

(shamelessy copied directly from the cucumber wiki for your convenience..

[5:08pm] Luis_Byclosure: I’m having problems applying the “5 Why” rule, to the feature
“login” (imagine an application like youtube)
[5:08pm] Luis_Byclosure: how do you explain the business value of the feature “login”?
[5:09pm] Luis_Byclosure: In order to be recognized among other people, I want to login
in the application (?)
[5:09pm] Luis_Byclosure: why do I want to be recognized among other people?
[5:11pm] aslakhellesoy: Why do people have to log in?
[5:12pm] Luis_Byclosure: I dunno… why?
[5:12pm] aslakhellesoy: I’m asking you
[5:13pm] aslakhellesoy: Why have you decided login is needed?
[5:13pm] Luis_Byclosure: identify users
[5:14pm] aslakhellesoy: Why do you have to identify users?
[5:14pm] Luis_Byclosure: maybe because people like to know who is
publishing what
[5:15pm] aslakhellesoy: Why would anyone want to know who’s publishing what?
[5:17pm] Luis_Byclosure: because if people feel that that content belongs
to someone, then the content is trustworthy
[5:17pm] aslakhellesoy: Why does content have to appear trustworthy?
[5:20pm] Luis_Byclosure: Trustworthy makes people interested in the content and
consequently in the website
[5:20pm] Luis_Byclosure: Why do I want to get people interested in the website?
[5:20pm] aslakhellesoy: 🙂
[5:21pm] aslakhellesoy: Are you selling something there? Or is it just for fun?
[5:21pm] Luis_Byclosure: Because more traffic means more money in ads
[5:21pm] aslakhellesoy: There you go!
[5:22pm] Luis_Byclosure: Why do I want to get more money in ads? Because I want to increase
de revenues.
[5:22pm] Luis_Byclosure: And this is the end, right?
[5:23pm] aslakhellesoy: In order to drive more people to the website and earn more admoney,
authors should have to login,
so that the content can be displayed with the author and appear
more trustworthy.
[5:23pm] aslakhellesoy: Does that make any sense?
[5:25pm] Luis_Byclosure: Yes, I think so
[5:26pm] aslakhellesoy: It’s easier when you have someone clueless (like me) to ask the
stupid why questions
[5:26pm] aslakhellesoy: Now I know why you want login
[5:26pm] Luis_Byclosure: but it is difficult to find the reason for everything
[5:26pm] aslakhellesoy: And if I was the customer I am in better shape to prioritise this
feature among others
[5:29pm] Luis_Byclosure: true!

https://github.com/cucumber/cucumber/wiki/

Valve Handbook

Employee Handbook describing Valve’s completely flat management structure. Not exactly a methodology that you could apply to a big shareholder owned corporate but a great example of how successful you can be if you hire good people and allow them to get on with their job.

Scaling a development team

In my job at westfield.com we’ve been dealing with the challenge of scaling a development team for years and are yet to get it anywhere near optimum.
This is great post on scaling a team from a company that should know all about it – Heroku.

http://adam.heroku.com/past/2011/4/28/scaling_a_development_team/

This is a great way to think about scaling and well worth a read although I think that most of the challenges one will meet scaling a team are not answered by this post – i.e. exactly how and along what lines you break up your teams. It’s interesting to see that the way Heroku broke up their teams was along horizontal layers rather than through functional areas but this probably reflects the highly technical nature of Heroku’s business.

We are currently undertaking a team restructure and I have been convinced for some time that to minimise friction, distraction and duplication, our teams at westfield.com need to be structured based on vertical slices of business functionality; allowing teams to own certain areas and functions of the site and business.

I’ll post again with an update when the teams are restructured and the results are in..